Linux Security Week: April 23rd, 2012
Source: LinuxSecurity Contributors - Posted by Benjamin D. Thomas   
Linux Security Week Thank you for reading the LinuxSecurity.com weekly security newsletter. The purpose of this document is to provide our readers with a quick summary of each week's most relevant Linux security headlines.

LinuxSecurity.com Feature Extras:

Password guessing with Medusa 2.0 - Medusa was created by the fine folks at foofus.net, in fact the much awaited Medusa 2.0 update was released in February of 2010. For a complete change log please visit http://www.foofus.net/jmk/medusa/changelog

Password guessing as an attack vector - Using password guessing as an attack vector. Over the years we've been taught a strong password must be long and complex to be considered secure. Some of us have taken that notion to heart and always ensure our passwords are strong. But some don't give a second thought to the complexity or length of our password.


  Simple Security Tricks To Harden A New Linux Web Server (Apr 16)
 

There are a few things you need to always remember when setting up a new Linux server. By default the root login is enabled for most systems. The best practice is to disable root login. Also, if you are transferring files via FTP, the best way to do this securely is via SFTP (not FTP).

  New Security Sensor Gives Admins Better View of Network Attacks (Apr 17)
 

A new security tool developed by Department of Energy engineers is designed to give security and IT administrators the ability to more quickly identify and respond to an issue on the network.

  How to delete yourself from the Internet (Apr 20)
 

You may not feel like the flotsam and jetsam that make up the facts of your life are important, but increasingly companies are using that dry data to make your every online step as indelible as if written in blood. Here's how to take back your digital dignity.

  Why switching OS platforms is not a security fix (Apr 17)
 

The Mac platform now finds itself in the crosshairs of malware developers along with Windows, but that isn't a reason to switch to Linux.

  Ohio ĎAnonymous' member, 21, pleads not guilty (Apr 17)
 

An Ohio man linked to the hacker collective "Anonymous" pleaded not guilty Monday to charges of breaching the websites of the Utah Chiefs of Police Association and the Salt Lake City Police Department.

  Website vulnerabilities fall, but hackers become more skilled (Apr 17)
 

The number of coding mistakes on websites continues to fall but companies are slow to fix issues that could be exploited by hackers working with improved attack tools, a security expert said.

  Hacktivism at risk as hackers turn on each other (Apr 16)
 

A spate of hacking tools infected with malicious software, or malware, threatens to destroy the credibility of the growing hacktivist movement, writes Adam Turner.

  The story of BSD and open-source Linux (Apr 19)
 

On March 9, 1977, Bill Joy compiled the first version of Berkeley Systems Distribution Unix, known as 1BSD. This version was just an add-on to an existing Unix, however. Two years later, he released 2BSD, which added two new programs from his repertoire: vi and the C Shell.

  15-year-old arrested for hacking 259 companies (Apr 18)
 

A 15-year-old boy has been arrested for hacking into 259 companies during a 90-day spree. In other words, during the last quarter he successfully attacked an average of three websites per day.

  Hacker's Tiny Spy Computer Cracks Corporate Networks, Fits In An Altoid Tin (Apr 18)
 

The next time an unexpected "repairman" cruises past your company's security desk, you might want to check inside his tin of mints or pack of cigarettes. Especially if he's also carrying an ethernet cable.

  Upcoming Firefox click-to-play feature will stop automated plug-in exploits (Apr 16)
 

Mozilla developers are working on a new Firefox feature that will block the automated display of plug-in-based content like Flash videos, Java applets or PDF files, and will protect users from attacks that exploit vulnerabilities in browser plug-ins to install malware on their computers.

  Mac Security: A Myth? (Apr 16)
 

Apple is taking steps to address the Java vulnerabilities behind the Flashback Trojan outbreak. But Java isn't the only attack vector for OS X -- and Apple users can no longer cling to the belief that Macs are virtually immune to malware.

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