Bring Back Deleted Files With Lsof
Source: Linux.com - Posted by Eric Lubow   
Latest News There you are, happily playing around with an audio file you've spent all afternoon tweaking, and you're thinking, "Wow, doesn't it sound great? Lemme just move it over here." At that point your subconscious chimes in, "Um, you meant mv, not rm, right?" Oops. I feel your pain -- this happens to everyone. But there's a straightforward method to recover your lost file, and since it works on every standard Linux system, everyone ought to know how to do it. Briefly, a file as it appears somewhere on a Linux filesystem is actually just a link to an inode, which contains all of the file's properties, such as permissions and ownership, as well as the addresses of the data blocks where the file's content is stored on disk. When you rm a file, you're removing the link that points to its inode, but not the inode itself; other processes (such as your audio player) might still have it open. It's only after they're through and all links are removed that an inode and the data blocks it pointed to are made available for writing.

This delay is your key to a quick and happy recovery: if a process still has the file open, the data's there somewhere, even though according to the directory listing the file already appears to be gone. This is where the Linux process pseudo-filesystem, the /proc directory, comes into play. Every process on the system has a directory here with its name on it, inside of which lies many things -- including an fd ("file descriptor") subdirectory containing links to all files that the process has open.

Read this full article at Linux.com

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