O'Reilly Releases "SSH, The Secure Shell: The Definitive Guide, Second Edition"
Source: PRNewswire - Posted by Benjamin D. Thomas   
Documentation The name looks like the sound you'd make to hush someone, which is not inappropriate if you think of SSH, the secure shell, as a means of silently sending information between computers. "SSH" is actually pronounced by spelling it aloud "S-S-H," and isn't a shell at all, but a protocol. The name was originally coined from the rsh utility, a Unix program that also provides logins.

What does SSH do? Whenever data is sent by a computer to the network, SSH automatically encrypts it; when the data reaches its intended recipient, SSH automatically decrypts it. The result is "transparent" encryption--users can work normally, unaware that their communications are safely encrypted on the network. In addition, SSH uses modern, secure encryption algorithms and is effective enough to be found within mission-critical applications at major corporations. "SSH is not a complete security solution," observe Daniel J. Barrett, Richard E. Silverman, and Robert G. Byrnes, authors of the second edition of "SSH, The Secure Shell: The Definitive Guide" ( O'Reilly ). "But what is?" they add.

Read this full article at PRNewswire

Only registered users can write comments.
Please login or register.

Powered by AkoComment!