Honeypot for hackers
Source: Lexis-Nexis - Posted by Nick DeClario   
Intrusion Detection COMPUTER experts can now predict when a malicious hacker is about to strike, and sound the alarm days in advance. They are urging companies to use their technique to stop hackers getting into networks. "Regardless of who you are, you . . . COMPUTER experts can now predict when a malicious hacker is about to strike, and sound the alarm days in advance. They are urging companies to use their technique to stop hackers getting into networks. "Regardless of who you are, you are not safe," says Jeffery Stutzman, an ex-naval intelligence officer now working as a security expert for Cisco Systems in Chelmsford, Massachusetts. "Companies and governments have spent millions of dollars working on the answer to this problem."

Stutzman is a member of an international group of experts called the Honeynet Project who devised the technique. They set up a decoy computer network to lure in hackers, dubbed "black hats" in the industry. The network was connected to the Internet, but it was not advertised and didn't contain anything worth stealing.

However, black hats attacked as many as 14 times a day, with one hacker even trying to gain access just 15 minutes after the network went online.

These fevered attempts to break into the system gave the Honeynet Project just the information needed to repel future hackers. Before trying to gain access to a network, black hats look for weaknesses by running programs that scan and probe networks.

Read this full article at Lexis-Nexis

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