Be extremely wary not to taint computer evidence
Source: Lexis-Nexis - Posted by Benjamin D. Thomas   
Intrusion Detection We've all seen it -- the yellow tape used to cordon off a crime scene in the movies. In terms of police work, it's called securing the scene. But how many of us realize that securing the scene for a what . . . We've all seen it -- the yellow tape used to cordon off a crime scene in the movies. In terms of police work, it's called securing the scene. But how many of us realize that securing the scene for a what may be a computer crime is just as important as it is for a homicide or fire? 'It's no different than a murder scene,' said Sush Gupta, a federal prosecutor specializing in computer crime. 'The more you play and the more you move, the more you tamper with the evidence.'

But unlike using gloves to move a knife at a stabbing scene, he said, which technically leaves the evidence in tact, with digital evidence, 'every time you move something, a digital record is destroyed.' Even turning a computer on or off could end up tainting the evidence.

Last week, Cpls. Paul Poloz and Stephane Denis, forensic investigators with the RCMP, provided insights into the pitfalls that could prejudice an investigation and even jeopardize a case. The session was part of a cybersabotage conference last week sponsored by IQPC of Toronto. Opening files, for example, could change valuable date stamps.

Read this full article at Lexis-Nexis

Only registered users can write comments.
Please login or register.

Powered by AkoComment!