Slackware: emacs and gpm vulnerabilities
Posted by LinuxSecurity.com Team   
Slackware Unauthorized access and other security vulnerabilities are present in emacs and gpm for Slackware 7.0 and slackware-current.
There are two security updates available for Slackware 7.0 and 
slackware-current. Affected packages are gpm.tgz and the E series (Emacs).
Users are advised to upgrade these packages as soon as possible.

   ===================================
   gpm 1.19.2 AVAILABLE - (a1/gpm.tgz)
   ===================================

      gpm was upgraded to 1.19.2 to fix remaining security problems in the
      gpm-root daemon.

   =================================
   emacs 20.6 AVAILABLE - (e1/*.tgz)
   =================================

      The E series was upgraded to GNU emacs 20.6.  This upgraded the
      following packages:

         elisp.tgz
         emac_nox.tgz
         emacinfo.tgz
         emacleim.tgz
         emacmisc.tgz
         emacsbin.tgz

      The recent security patch posted to BugTraq by RUS-CERT, University
      of Stuttgart was applied before building the packages.  The holes
      fixed include:

         o   Under certain circumstances, unprivileged local users can
             eavesdrop the communication between Emacs and its subprocesses.

         o   It is impossible to safely create temporary files in a public
             directory from Emacs Lisp.

         o   The history of recently typed keys may expose passwords.

      The entire advisory (as well as the patch) can be read on
      ftp.slackware.com in:
         /pub/slackware/slackware-current/source/e/emacs-rus-cert.diff.gz

Separate patches will not be produced for the /patches directory in the
Slackware 7.0 distribution tree.  Users of Slackware 7.0 can download the
necessary packages from the Slackware-current tree and run upgradepkg to
install them.

It's generally a good idea to bring your system into runlevel 1 when doing
package upgrades, just to minimize error.

   # telinit 1
   # upgradepkg 
   # telinit 3

Remember, it's also a good idea to backup configuration files before upgrading
packages.