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Linux Security Week: June 10th, 2014 Print E-mail
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Source: LinuxSecurity Contributors - Posted by Benjamin D. Thomas   
Linux Security Week Thank you for reading the LinuxSecurity.com weekly security newsletter. The purpose of this document is to provide our readers with a quick summary of each week's most relevant Linux security headlines.

LinuxSecurity.com Feature Extras:

Peter Smith Releases Linux Network Security Online - Thanks so much to Peter Smith for announcing on linuxsecurity.com the release of his Linux Network Security book available free online. "In 2005 I wrote a book on Linux security. 8 years later and the publisher has gone out of business. Now that I'm free from restrictions on reproducing material from the book, I have decided to make the entire book available online."

Securing a Linux Web Server - With the significant prevalence of Linux web servers globally, security is often touted as a strength of the platform for such a purpose. However, a Linux based web server is only as secure as its configuration and very often many are quite vulnerable to compromise. While specific configurations vary wildly due to environments or specific use, there are various general steps that can be taken to insure basic security considerations are in place.


  Chinese Hacking of the US (Jun 2)
 

Chinese hacking of American computer networks is old news. For years we've known about their attacks against U.S. government and corporate targets. We've seen detailed reports of how they hacked The New York Times. Google has detected them going after Gmail accounts of dissidents.

  In baffling move, TrueCrypt open-source crypto project shuts down (Jun 2)
 

In a move that appears designed to provoke widespread questions, the anonymous managers of the TrueCrypt open-source encryption project abruptly pulled the plug on the effort without explanation.

  GnuTLS bug exposes Linux clients to server attacks (Jun 2)
 

The maintainers of GnuTLS, a secure communications library used in Red Hat, Ubuntu other Linux distributions, have released fixes for a critical bug affecting the client-side of the software.

  A Hacker Looks at 40. (Jun 3)
 

Wow. It's finally happened – the fabled 40th birthday that everyone loathes. It's upon me. At 40, I think you're supposed to reflect back on what you've done, what you've accomplished, what's been good and bad, and where the hell you're going in life. Right? OK, this will depend largely on the individual, but 40 feels like a pretty damn good spot to reflect. Why not?

  Wearable Tech - Can your life be hacked? (Jun 2)
 

Paraphrasing the song made famous in the 1960s by The Troggs and wonderfully updated by Bill Nighy in "Love Actually" Big Data is really all around us. We are making more and more data about ourselves available to a broader audience. But what if that data is stolen? Is it useful to anyone?

  Google, in promoting encryption, calls out Microsoft and Comcast (Jun 4)
 

Encryption is like a relationship -- both parties need to be on the same page for it to work. And Microsoft and Comcast are apparently not on Google's page.

  5 lessons from companies that get computer security right (Jun 4)
 

Most organizations are very bad at computer security.They don't patch well, and they have short, simple passwords that don't expire. They have dozens to hundreds of people in elevated groups. They don't have a clue who has which permissions in their environment.

  The man behind the ‘Swiss Army knife' for hackers – GameOver Zeus (Jun 5)
 

"Cybercrime royalty" – that's how one security researcher described Evgeny Bogachev, the man the US Government accused on Monday of being behind the world's most advanced computer crime network.

  How to throw a CryptoParty like Edward Snowden (Jun 5)
 

Six months before the entire world knew his name, Edward Snowden threw a CryptoParty in Hawaii with privacy researcher Runa Sandvik in an effort to teach locals how to protect their online privacy from threats as big as the National Security Agency or Google. Twenty Hawaiians attended the workshop taught by Sandvik and Snowden, who later called the event a "huge success."

  Google debuts PGP email encryption plugin for Chrome (Jun 5)
 

Google has released the alpha version of a new Chrome browser extension called End-To-End that allows users to encrypt, decrypt, digitally sign, and verify signed emails all within the browser.

  Several Governments Have Backdoor Access to Phone Networks, Says Vodafone (Jun 6)
 

An undisclosed number of countries have direct backdoor access to the communications passing through the network of telecommunications giant Vodafone, without needing to obtain a warrant, according to a new transparency report released by the company.

  New OpenSSL breach is no Heartbleed, but needs to be taken seriously (Jun 6)
 

It's been a bad week for open-source Secure Socket Layer (SSL) programs.First, the obscure, GnuTLS was revealed to have a trivial but damning flaw. Then, the massively popular OpenSSL was found to have a man-in-the-middle vulnerability. After the Heartbleed fiasco, OpenSSL needed this like a hole in the head.

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