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Simple Security Tricks To Harden A New Linux Web Server Print E-mail
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Source: pinhead.tv - Posted by Anthony Pell   
Server Security There are a few things you need to always remember when setting up a new Linux server. By default the root login is enabled for most systems. The best practice is to disable root login. Also, if you are transferring files via FTP, the best way to do this securely is via SFTP (not FTP). The quick difference is that FTP sends passwords/data in plain text versus encrypted text in SFTP. Letís take a look at how to solve these issues and harden a Linux server.

When building a new Linux server, always make sure to create a root user A root user has all the same powers as root. Itís a simple process called sudo. If your running Ubuntu as your server, then sudo is already installed on your system. Look to see if /etc/sudoers exists on your system. If it doesnít and you are on a Debian based system, just type apt-get install sudoers to download the package.

Read this full article at pinhead.tv

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