LinuxSecurity.com
Share your story
The central voice for Linux and Open Source security news
Home News Topics Advisories HOWTOs Features Newsletters About Register

Welcome!
Sign up!
EnGarde Community
Login
Polls
What is the most important Linux security technology?
 
Advisories
Community
Linux Events
Linux User Groups
Link to Us
Security Center
Book Reviews
Security Dictionary
Security Tips
SELinux
White Papers
Featured Blogs
All About Linux
DanWalsh LiveJournal
Securitydistro
Latest Newsletters
Linux Advisory Watch: July 18th, 2014
Linux Advisory Watch: July 13th, 2014
Subscribe
LinuxSecurity Newsletters
E-mail:
Choose Lists:
About our Newsletters
RSS Feeds
Get the LinuxSecurity news you want faster with RSS
Powered By

  
iptables rules for desktop computers Print E-mail
User Rating:      How can I rate this item?
Source: 503 Service Unavailable Blog - Posted by Anthony Pell   
Firewalls Today I will show you the iptables rules I set on my main personal computer, with detailed comments about why I came to use these rules after several years of Linux desktop usage. The rules I use now have been simplified as much as I could and are based on common rules and advice that can be found on the network and also on input I got from experienced network administrators. I’ve been using them unmodified for a few years. They are designed for desktop users either directly connected to the Internet or behind a router. They are a bit restrictive in some aspects but we’ll see you can easily create a few holes for specific purposes. So here they are:

# iptables -v -L
Chain INPUT (policy DROP 0 packets, 0 bytes)
 pkts bytes target     prot opt in     out     source               destination
 663K  905M ACCEPT     all  --  any    any     anywhere             anywhere            state RELATED,ESTABLISHED
  105  6300 ACCEPT     all  --  lo     any     anywhere             anywhere
    0     0 ACCEPT     icmp --  any    any     anywhere             anywhere            icmp destination-unreachable
    0     0 ACCEPT     icmp --  any    any     anywhere             anywhere            icmp time-exceeded
    0     0 ACCEPT     icmp --  any    any     anywhere             anywhere            icmp source-quench
    0     0 ACCEPT     icmp --  any    any     anywhere             anywhere            icmp parameter-problem
    0     0 DROP       tcp  --  any    any     anywhere             anywhere            tcp flags:!FIN,SYN,RST,ACK/SYN state NEW

Chain FORWARD (policy DROP 0 packets, 0 bytes)
 pkts bytes target     prot opt in     out     source               destination

Chain OUTPUT (policy ACCEPT 0 packets, 0 bytes)
 pkts bytes target     prot opt in     out     source               destination

We’ll start by the most obvious rules. The FORWARD chain has a policy of “DROP” and no specific rules. A desktop computer isn’t usually employed as a router or to share an Internet connection, so there’s no reason in allowing forwarding.

Read this full article at 503 Service Unavailable Blog

Only registered users can write comments.
Please login or register.

Powered by AkoComment!

 
< Prev   Next >
    
Partner

 

Latest Features
Peter Smith Releases Linux Network Security Online
Securing a Linux Web Server
Password guessing with Medusa 2.0
Password guessing as an attack vector
Squid and Digest Authentication
Squid and Basic Authentication
Demystifying the Chinese Hacking Industry: Earning 6 Million a Night
Free Online security course (LearnSIA) - A Call for Help
What You Need to Know About Linux Rootkits
Review: A Practical Guide to Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux - Fifth Edition
Yesterday's Edition
How Hackers Hid a Money-Mining Botnet in Amazon’s Cloud
Homeland Security gets into software security
Partner Sponsor

Community | HOWTOs | Blogs | Features | Book Reviews | Networking
 Security Projects |  Latest News |  Newsletters |  SELinux |  Privacy |  Home
 Hardening |   About Us |   Advertise |   Legal Notice |   RSS |   Guardian Digital
(c)Copyright 2014 Guardian Digital, Inc. All rights reserved.