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Jailbreaking iPhone could pose threat to national security, Apple claims Print E-mail
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Source: CNET - Posted by Administrator   
Wireless Security Apple stated in its filing that by changing the BBP's code, "More pernicious forms of activity may also be enabled. For example, a local or international hacker could potentially initiate commands (such as a denial-of-service attack) that could crash the tower software, rendering the tower entirely inoperable to process calls or transmit data. In short, taking control of the BBP software would be much the equivalent of getting inside the firewall of a corporate computer--to potentially catastrophic result." Now this is scary because I've never thought the iPhone--being the "Jesus" phone as it is--would have that capability. I always thought that Apple has been trying to keep it locked simply so AT&T could offer it exclusively in the States, which has been possibly the most successful exclusive offer a wireless carrier has ever had; and so Apple could keep tight control over its App Store, which is also a huge success. How naive and non-vigilant of me!

Another somewhat less serious manifestation of jailbreaking the iPhone that Apple mentioned is the fact that when changing the BBP code, a hacker can also change the iPhone's unique Exclusive Chip Identification (ECID) and therefore enable phone calls to be made anonymously, which "would be desirable to drug dealers".

Read this full article at CNET

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