LinuxSecurity.com
Share your story
The central voice for Linux and Open Source security news
Home News Topics Advisories HOWTOs Features Newsletters About Register

Welcome!
Sign up!
EnGarde Community
Login
Polls
What is the most important Linux security technology?
 
Advisories
Community
Linux Events
Linux User Groups
Link to Us
Security Center
Book Reviews
Security Dictionary
Security Tips
SELinux
White Papers
Featured Blogs
All About Linux
DanWalsh LiveJournal
Securitydistro
Latest Newsletters
Linux Advisory Watch: September 26th, 2014
Linux Security Week: September 22nd, 2014
Subscribe
LinuxSecurity Newsletters
E-mail:
Choose Lists:
About our Newsletters
RSS Feeds
Get the LinuxSecurity news you want faster with RSS
Powered By

  
Cybercrime Spurs College Courses In Digital Forensics Print E-mail
User Rating:      How can I rate this item?
Source: USA Today - Posted by Eric Lubow   
Security One of the hottest new courses on U.S. college campuses is a direct result of cybercrime. Classes in digital forensics - the collection, examination and presentation of digitally stored evidence in criminal and civil investigations - are cropping up as fast as the hackers and viruses that spawn them. About 100 colleges and universities offer undergraduate and graduate courses in digital forensics, with a few offering majors. There are programs at Purdue University, Johns Hopkins University, the University of Tulsa, Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Central Florida. Five years ago, there were only a handful.

"I teach students to be like (TV supersleuth) MacGyver," says Sujeet Shenoi, a computer science professor at the University of Tulsa. Traditional students, police officers, government employees and aspiring security consultants are taking the courses as more crooks stash ill-gotten data and goods on PCs, PDAs, cellphones, network servers, iPods and even Xboxes. Students learn where to find digital evidence and handle it without contaminating it. Once preserved, students are shown how to examine evidence and present it clearly during court testimony. "If you revert to geek speak, you can lose a judge, jury and prosecutor," says Mark Pollitt, a digital forensics professor at Johns Hopkins University who retired in 2003 after 20 years as an FBI agent.

Read this full article at USA Today

Only registered users can write comments.
Please login or register.

Powered by AkoComment!

 
< Prev   Next >
    
Partner

 

Latest Features
Peter Smith Releases Linux Network Security Online
Securing a Linux Web Server
Password guessing with Medusa 2.0
Password guessing as an attack vector
Squid and Digest Authentication
Squid and Basic Authentication
Demystifying the Chinese Hacking Industry: Earning 6 Million a Night
Free Online security course (LearnSIA) - A Call for Help
What You Need to Know About Linux Rootkits
Review: A Practical Guide to Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux - Fifth Edition
Yesterday's Edition
Honeypot Snares Two Bots Exploiting Bash Vulnerability
CloudFlare Rolls Out Free SSL
Partner Sponsor

Community | HOWTOs | Blogs | Features | Book Reviews | Networking
 Security Projects |  Latest News |  Newsletters |  SELinux |  Privacy |  Home
 Hardening |   About Us |   Advertise |   Legal Notice |   RSS |   Guardian Digital
(c)Copyright 2014 Guardian Digital, Inc. All rights reserved.