LinuxSecurity.com
Share your story
The central voice for Linux and Open Source security news
Home News Topics Advisories HOWTOs Features Newsletters About Register

Welcome!
Sign up!
EnGarde Community
Login
Polls
What is the most important Linux security technology?
 
Advisories
Community
Linux Events
Linux User Groups
Link to Us
Security Center
Book Reviews
Security Dictionary
Security Tips
SELinux
White Papers
Featured Blogs
All About Linux
DanWalsh LiveJournal
Securitydistro
Latest Newsletters
Linux Security Week: September 15th, 2014
Linux Security Week: September 8th, 2014
Subscribe
LinuxSecurity Newsletters
E-mail:
Choose Lists:
About our Newsletters
RSS Feeds
Get the LinuxSecurity news you want faster with RSS
Powered By

  
Nessus fork emerges Print E-mail
User Rating:      How can I rate this item?
Source: Newsforge - Posted by Pax Dickinson   
Security Projects With news settling in that the makers of the network vulnerability scanner Nessus will not open source the next version of the software, the team behind the soon-to-be-renamed GNessUs project is growing fast and attracting attention.

Word broke on October 5 that Tenable Network Security, the company founded in 1998 to hold the copyright for Nessus, would not release Nessus 3.0 under the GNU General Public License (GPL). The company said it would continue to maintain the GPLed 2.2.x series, but would not open the source of the impending Nessus 3. By October 10, the GNessUs project launched a fork based on Nessus 2.2.5 and a community quickly began forming around it.

Tim Brown, a penetration tester for Portcullis Computer Security Limited in the UK and founder of GNessUs, said the idea to fork the project came out of conversations with colleagues in the security industry in England.

Brown said that the company's move to drop the GPL for Nessus 3 was no great surprise after Tenable split the plugin streams for the software and ignored concerns by Brown and others that vulnerabilities would be missed because people refused to check the streams for either fiscal or ethical reasons. "My fork is dedicated to that community," Brown said.

The split last December created a three-part stream structure that offered a fee-based "Direct Feed" with the latest vulnerability checks available from Tenable, a delayed feed available to those who registered with Tenable and agreed to Tenable's license agreement for plugins, and a "GPL Feed" with plugins from the user community.

Read this full article at Newsforge

Only registered users can write comments.
Please login or register.

Powered by AkoComment!

 
< Prev   Next >
    
Partner

 

Latest Features
Peter Smith Releases Linux Network Security Online
Securing a Linux Web Server
Password guessing with Medusa 2.0
Password guessing as an attack vector
Squid and Digest Authentication
Squid and Basic Authentication
Demystifying the Chinese Hacking Industry: Earning 6 Million a Night
Free Online security course (LearnSIA) - A Call for Help
What You Need to Know About Linux Rootkits
Review: A Practical Guide to Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux - Fifth Edition
Yesterday's Edition
Middle-School Dropout Codes Clever Chat Program That Foils NSA Spying
FreeBSD Patches DoS Vulnerability
Rogue cell towers discovered in Washington, D.C.
Partner Sponsor

Community | HOWTOs | Blogs | Features | Book Reviews | Networking
 Security Projects |  Latest News |  Newsletters |  SELinux |  Privacy |  Home
 Hardening |   About Us |   Advertise |   Legal Notice |   RSS |   Guardian Digital
(c)Copyright 2014 Guardian Digital, Inc. All rights reserved.