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New hack cracks 'secure' Bluetooth devices Print E-mail
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Source: New Scientist - Posted by Pax Dickinson   
Wireless Security Cryptographers have discovered a way to hack Bluetooth-enabled devices even when security features are switched on. The discovery may make it even easier for hackers to eavesdrop on conversations and charge their own calls to someone else’s cellphone.

Bluetooth is a protocol that allows different devices including phones, laptops, headsets and printers to communicate wirelessly over short ranges - typically between 10 and 100 metres.

Over the past few years security experts have devised many ways of hacking into Bluetooth communications, but most require the Bluetooth security features to be switched off.

In April 2004, UK-based Ollie Whitehouse, at that time working for security firm @Stake, showed that even Bluetooth devices in secure mode could be attacked. His method allowed someone to hijack the phone, giving them the power to make calls as if it were in their own hands.

But this technique did not pose a serious risk because it could be performed only if the hacker happened to catch two Bluetooth devices just before their first communication, during a process known as “pairing?.

Before two Bluetooth devices can communicate they must establish a secret key via this pairing process. But as long as the two devices paired up in a private place there was no risk of attack, explains Chris McNab of the UK security firm TrustMatta.

Now Avishai Wool and Yaniv Shaked of Tel Aviv University in Israel have worked out how to force devices to pair whenever they want. “Our attack makes it possible to crack every communication between two Bluetooth devices, and not only if it is the first communication between those devices,? says Shaked.

“Pairing allows you to seize control,? says Bruce Schneier, a security expert based in Mountain View, California. “You can sit on the train and make phone calls on someone else’s phone.?

Read this full article at New Scientist

Comments
how to get the softwareWritten by james on 2007-08-04 09:40:51
hii i am james i want a software soo i can hack my mates phone and turn his phone off it is a moblie.

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