LinuxSecurity.com
Share your story
The central voice for Linux and Open Source security news
Home News Topics Advisories HOWTOs Features Newsletters About Register

Welcome!
Sign up!
EnGarde Community
Login
Polls
What is the most important Linux security technology?
 
Advisories
Community
Linux Events
Linux User Groups
Link to Us
Security Center
Book Reviews
Security Dictionary
Security Tips
SELinux
White Papers
Featured Blogs
All About Linux
DanWalsh LiveJournal
Securitydistro
Latest Newsletters
Linux Advisory Watch: November 21st, 2014
Linux Security Week: November 17th, 2014
Subscribe
LinuxSecurity Newsletters
E-mail:
Choose Lists:
About our Newsletters
RSS Feeds
Get the LinuxSecurity news you want faster with RSS
Powered By

  
The two-edged sword: Legal computer forensics and open source Print E-mail
User Rating:      How can I rate this item?
Source: NewsForge - Posted by Pax Dickinson   
Security Ryan Purita of Totally Connected Security is one of the leading computer forensic experts in private practice in Canada. He is a Certified Information Systems Security Professional, holding one of the most advanced security qualifications in the world. Working for both the prosecution and the defence in legal cases, Purita has also taught computer security to law enforcement agencies, probation officers and social workers, and is currently developing programs for the Justice Institute of British Columbia. Much of his daily work is an extension of a system administrator's activities. A good part of it involves the advanced use of open source tools, including several standard system tools. His work methods offer fresh perspectives on security, privacy issues and the relative merits of Windows and GNU/Linux -- to say nothing of a niche industry where open source is more than holding its own.

"Computer forensics" is a term that is usually applied to an investigation after a system has been cracked. And, in fact, Purita's work does sometimes fall under this definition. However, the term is also used more narrowly to define investigations that find evidence for legal purposes. Illegal possession of trade secrets, intellectual property or child pornography, the dismissal of employees, divorce, insurance fraud, insider trading, counterfeiting, criminal or sexual harassment -- any of these could require a forensic investigation of a hard drive, removable media, or network.

Although open source tools are not the only ones available for computer forensics, they are among the most widely used. A GNU/Linux enthusiast, Purita often prefers the open source tools. However, he frequently uses proprietary ones as well. The proprietary tools, he explains, are "pretty," with better developed GUIs that are easier for clients to understand. Moreover, the precedence for accepting their evidence in court is well established although, increasingly, their open source equivalents are not far behind.

Read this full article at NewsForge

Only registered users can write comments.
Please login or register.

Powered by AkoComment!

 
< Prev   Next >
    
Partner

 

Latest Features
Peter Smith Releases Linux Network Security Online
Securing a Linux Web Server
Password guessing with Medusa 2.0
Password guessing as an attack vector
Squid and Digest Authentication
Squid and Basic Authentication
Demystifying the Chinese Hacking Industry: Earning 6 Million a Night
Free Online security course (LearnSIA) - A Call for Help
What You Need to Know About Linux Rootkits
Review: A Practical Guide to Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux - Fifth Edition
Yesterday's Edition
Partner Sponsor

Community | HOWTOs | Blogs | Features | Book Reviews | Networking
 Security Projects |  Latest News |  Newsletters |  SELinux |  Privacy |  Home
 Hardening |   About Us |   Advertise |   Legal Notice |   RSS |   Guardian Digital
(c)Copyright 2014 Guardian Digital, Inc. All rights reserved.