LinuxSecurity.com
Share your story
The central voice for Linux and Open Source security news
Home News Topics Advisories HOWTOs Features Newsletters About Register

Welcome!
Sign up!
EnGarde Community
Login
Polls
What is the most important Linux security technology?
 
Advisories
Community
Linux Events
Linux User Groups
Link to Us
Security Center
Book Reviews
Security Dictionary
Security Tips
SELinux
White Papers
Featured Blogs
All About Linux
DanWalsh LiveJournal
Securitydistro
Latest Newsletters
Linux Security Week: October 20th, 2014
Linux Advisory Watch: October 17th, 2014
Subscribe
LinuxSecurity Newsletters
E-mail:
Choose Lists:
About our Newsletters
RSS Feeds
Get the LinuxSecurity news you want faster with RSS
Powered By

  
High Profile, Low Security Print E-mail
User Rating:      How can I rate this item?
Source: securityfocus.com - Posted by Vincenzo Ciaglia   
Security I'll tell you a secret. If you're looking for a security consultant during the day and he's not in the office, you might find him in a neighborhood coffee shop consuming large doses of caffeine, and using a laptop with wireless net access. It's nice to people watch, catch up on the news, review technical articles and yes, even work, while enjoying that magic elixir (coffee) thanks to the wonders of WiFi. I find it a great way to take a break. You can imagine my disappointment early last week when I swung by one of my favorite haunts, grabbed a latte, opened up a terminal and watched my SSH attempt fail. Shoot -- their Internet connection must be down.


I quickly fired up tcpdump and was surprised to see the screen light up with packets flowing back and forth. That's odd, I thought, so I opened a browser. But instead of my usual homepage I was greeted with a stern, legal warning. My wireless coffee shop was now all grown up.

At some point since my last visit, they had implemented a rather slick wireless authentication system. The homepage explained that people had been abusing the free access, doing all sorts of nefarious things. To combat this and to protect their customers, the owners were now requiring a username and password authentication that could be obtained from a barista. Hah -- I thought, they must be handing out the same name and password to everyone. I was shocked again as the gentleman behind the counter confidently explained that they had implemented randomly generated combinations "for better security."

Read this full article at securityfocus.com

Only registered users can write comments.
Please login or register.

Powered by AkoComment!

 
< Prev   Next >
    
Partner

 

Latest Features
Peter Smith Releases Linux Network Security Online
Securing a Linux Web Server
Password guessing with Medusa 2.0
Password guessing as an attack vector
Squid and Digest Authentication
Squid and Basic Authentication
Demystifying the Chinese Hacking Industry: Earning 6 Million a Night
Free Online security course (LearnSIA) - A Call for Help
What You Need to Know About Linux Rootkits
Review: A Practical Guide to Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux - Fifth Edition
Yesterday's Edition
USB is now UEC (use with extreme caution)
iPhone Encryption and the Return of the Crypto Wars
Partner Sponsor

Community | HOWTOs | Blogs | Features | Book Reviews | Networking
 Security Projects |  Latest News |  Newsletters |  SELinux |  Privacy |  Home
 Hardening |   About Us |   Advertise |   Legal Notice |   RSS |   Guardian Digital
(c)Copyright 2014 Guardian Digital, Inc. All rights reserved.