LinuxSecurity.com
Share your story
The central voice for Linux and Open Source security news
Home News Topics Advisories HOWTOs Features Newsletters About Register

Welcome!
Sign up!
EnGarde Community
Login
Polls
What is the most important Linux security technology?
 
Advisories
Community
Linux Events
Linux User Groups
Link to Us
Security Center
Book Reviews
Security Dictionary
Security Tips
SELinux
White Papers
Featured Blogs
All About Linux
DanWalsh LiveJournal
Securitydistro
Latest Newsletters
Linux Advisory Watch: November 21st, 2014
Linux Security Week: November 17th, 2014
Subscribe
LinuxSecurity Newsletters
E-mail:
Choose Lists:
About our Newsletters
RSS Feeds
Get the LinuxSecurity news you want faster with RSS
Powered By

  
Bad, Bad Bots Print E-mail
User Rating:      How can I rate this item?
Source: securitypipeline.com - Posted by Vincenzo Ciaglia   
Hacks/Cracks Automated attacks are coming from unexpected quarters--from across the globe, across town, and most creepily, even from across the hall. According to a recent report from anti-virus vendor Symantec, this year's 450 percent increase in the number of attacks on Windows machines is evidence that automation is proving as efficient for 21st-Century hackers as it did for 20th-Century manufacturers.

Automated attacks are coming from unexpected quarters--from across the globe, across town, and most creepily, even from across the hall.


According to a recent report from anti-virus vendor Symantec, this year's 450 percent increase in the number of attacks on Windows machines is evidence that automation is proving as efficient for 21st-Century hackers as it did for 20th-Century manufacturers.


By including a backdoor component with their worms and viruses, hackers can gain access to infected machines without the owners' knowledge. Once that access is available, the machines become "bots," controlled remotely by hackers to do their nefarious bidding.


The latest disturbing trend sees hackers assembling thousands of hijacked computers into huge "bot networks." Such networks both vastly amplify the hackers' ability to wreak havoc, and complicate the task of authorities trying to track down the cybercriminals.


Bot networks can be used for any number of criminal activities, ranging from sending out more worms and viruses with more backdoors, to mass-spam mailings, to launching denial of service attacks, to hosting phishing sites that pose as legitimate financial institutions.


The 100 percent increase in phishing sites between September and October of this year is viewed by the Anti-Phishing Working Group as evidence that bot networks have been used to send more payload-bearing e-mails and to host scam sites.

Read this full article at securitypipeline.com

Only registered users can write comments.
Please login or register.

Powered by AkoComment!

 
< Prev   Next >
    
Partner

 

Latest Features
Peter Smith Releases Linux Network Security Online
Securing a Linux Web Server
Password guessing with Medusa 2.0
Password guessing as an attack vector
Squid and Digest Authentication
Squid and Basic Authentication
Demystifying the Chinese Hacking Industry: Earning 6 Million a Night
Free Online security course (LearnSIA) - A Call for Help
What You Need to Know About Linux Rootkits
Review: A Practical Guide to Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux - Fifth Edition
Yesterday's Edition
Google Removes SSLv3 Fallback Support From Chrome
Hacker Lexicon: What Is End-to-End Encryption?
Partner Sponsor

Community | HOWTOs | Blogs | Features | Book Reviews | Networking
 Security Projects |  Latest News |  Newsletters |  SELinux |  Privacy |  Home
 Hardening |   About Us |   Advertise |   Legal Notice |   RSS |   Guardian Digital
(c)Copyright 2014 Guardian Digital, Inc. All rights reserved.