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A New Twist in Computer Security Tools Print E-mail
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Source: BusinessWeek - Posted by Jen Olson   
Intrusion Detection Called intrusion-detection systems (IDS), these programs serve as active sentries on a network or a desktop, sniffing out what could be signs of unauthorized activity and alerting either the PC owner or a network administrator. They trace their roots back to . . . Called intrusion-detection systems (IDS), these programs serve as active sentries on a network or a desktop, sniffing out what could be signs of unauthorized activity and alerting either the PC owner or a network administrator. They trace their roots back to tools used to map networks and determine, via remote queries, the operating systems of machines hooked to a network ­- both routine tasks of corporate systems departments. Advanced security experts have used complicated IDS packages for years, though they've often complained that these systems are hard to configure and slow down the networks they watch over.

WORM PROTECTION. Even though both complaints are still frequently heard, IDS users are approaching critical mass, making Net security a troika of products. In part, that reflects a recent outbreak of more potent PC pathogens, such as Nimda. Rather than rely on a single method of entry into networks, the newest viruses (or worm viruses, as they are often called) test multiple entry points. They may try to get into a network from an e-mail program or through an open port in the firewall that allows a connection to the Net. They're especially dangerous because a network's number of possible entry points expands continually as more and more devices are added to it.

Read this full article at BusinessWeek

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