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An Overview of LIDS Print E-mail
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Source: SecurityFocus - Posted by Jen Olson   
Security Projects In traditional Unix models, the root user is all-powerful. Root is exempt from the rules and regulations of the filesystem, and has abilities that other users do not: putting interfaces into promiscuous mode, for example. Many folks realized that this uncontrolled . . . In traditional Unix models, the root user is all-powerful. Root is exempt from the rules and regulations of the filesystem, and has abilities that other users do not: putting interfaces into promiscuous mode, for example. Many folks realized that this uncontrolled access could be a bad thing. Should a vulnerability be found in a program that is run as root, it could cause boundless damage. More importantly, should an attacker manage to gain root access to your machine, there is no limit to what they could do.

The Linux Intrusion Detection System (LIDS) is a Linux kernel patch that will allow users to take away the all-powerful nature of root. They will be able to give programs exactly the access they need, and no more. The root user can be stripped of all his majesty until he is no more powerful than any other user. In the end, it is possible to have a completely functioning system, without worry that some wayward process or malicious cracker can destroy a machine beyond reparability.

This article is the first part of a three-part series that will offer an overview of LIDS. This installment will offer an introduction to LIDS, including how it works, booting LIDS, sealing the kernel, and configuring LIDS.

Read this full article at SecurityFocus

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