LinuxSecurity.com
Share your story
The central voice for Linux and Open Source security news
Home News Topics Advisories HOWTOs Features Newsletters About Register

Welcome!
Sign up!
EnGarde Community
Login
Polls
What is the most important Linux security technology?
 
Advisories
Community
Linux Events
Linux User Groups
Link to Us
Security Center
Book Reviews
Security Dictionary
Security Tips
SELinux
White Papers
Featured Blogs
All About Linux
DanWalsh LiveJournal
Securitydistro
Latest Newsletters
Linux Advisory Watch: December 19th, 2014
Linux Advisory Watch: December 12th, 2014
Subscribe
LinuxSecurity Newsletters
E-mail:
Choose Lists:
About our Newsletters
RSS Feeds
Get the LinuxSecurity news you want faster with RSS
Powered By

  
SubDomain - Security Software for Linux Print E-mail
User Rating:      How can I rate this item?
Source: SecurityPortal.com    - Posted by LinuxSecurity.com Team   
Vendors/Products There have been a number of recent announcements regarding new security software and enhancements for Linux. SGI has started releasing their patches that will hopefully bring Linux "C2" and "B1" security ratings, as set out by the DoD Orange book . . . There have been a number of recent announcements regarding new security software and enhancements for Linux. SGI has started releasing their patches that will hopefully bring Linux "C2" and "B1" security ratings, as set out by the DoD Orange book standard. These additions will not be ready for production use for quite some time. One of the perceived areas where Linux is behind other operating systems, such as NT, is in it's lack of access control lists (ACL's). Many would argue, myself included, that ACL's are a fine addition to system security if used properly, but because of their complexity this is often a problem. User's can end up with additional access rights to files/directories that they shouldn't have. Another problem is that file system controls, even fine grained ones such as ACL's, do not easily address what files a process can and cannot access. Getting a process to run as a distinct non-root user is sometimes not an easy task and has a tendency of breaking things like time synchronization software. The good news is this is exactly what SubDomain addresses.

Read this full article at SecurityPortal.com   

Only registered users can write comments.
Please login or register.

Powered by AkoComment!

 
< Prev   Next >
    
Partner

 

Latest Features
Peter Smith Releases Linux Network Security Online
Securing a Linux Web Server
Password guessing with Medusa 2.0
Password guessing as an attack vector
Squid and Digest Authentication
Squid and Basic Authentication
Demystifying the Chinese Hacking Industry: Earning 6 Million a Night
Free Online security course (LearnSIA) - A Call for Help
What You Need to Know About Linux Rootkits
Review: A Practical Guide to Fedora and Red Hat Enterprise Linux - Fifth Edition
Yesterday's Edition
Report: U.S. planning proportional response to Sony hack, blamed on North Korea
Heartbleed, Shellshock, Tor and more: The 13 biggest security stories of 2014
Partner Sponsor

Community | HOWTOs | Blogs | Features | Book Reviews | Networking
 Security Projects |  Latest News |  Newsletters |  SELinux |  Privacy |  Home
 Hardening |   About Us |   Advertise |   Legal Notice |   RSS |   Guardian Digital
(c)Copyright 2014 Guardian Digital, Inc. All rights reserved.