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Wireless Security
We have thousands of posts on a wide variety of open source and security topics, conveniently organized for searching or just browsing.



Using Intrusion Detection Systems To Keep Your WLAN Safe  06 April 2005 
Source: Security Pipeline - Posted by Pax Dickinson   
Wireless LANs utilize radio waves for transporting information, which results in security vulnerabilities that justifiably worry network managers. To assuage those worries, most companies implement authentication and encryption to harden security.

However, WLANs have a whole host of other vulnerabilities that can be more difficult to completely smother such as illicit monitoring, unauthorized access, and denial of service (DoS) attacks. For example, someone using a wireless sniffer, such as the freely-available NetStumbler, can easily monitor wireless traffic for fun or malicious intent while sitting in their car next to your office building.

 
How 20% effort can get you 80% security  06 April 2005 
Source: TechTarget.com - Posted by Benjamin D. Thomas   
To manage risk, maintain razor-sharp security architecture and still enjoy a peaceful night's sleep, security professionals at this week's InfoSec World conference offered this advice: Know your limits, speak the boss's language and embrace change. It also wouldn't hurt to learn the 80/20 principle -- the theory of 19th-century economist-mathematician Vilfredo Pareto that 20% of what you do makes 80% of the difference.

 
Mobile-proofing your network  04 April 2005 
Source: SearchSecurity - Posted by Pax Dickinson   
A stolen laptop made public last week by the University of California, Berkeley contained unencrypted personal data on nearly 100,000 graduate students and applicants and is just the latest case to underscore the need for increased protection of personal information.

 
The 10 Worst Security Practices  28 March 2005 
Source: Security Pipeline - Posted by Pax Dickinson   
Security specialists are constantly on the lookout for proven methods we can replicate to keep our networks and data safe. Independent consultants provide an outsider's perspective and carry with them the aggregate experience of helping hundreds of clients. But not every practice consultants see in the field is a good one--in fact, they encounter some stunningly bad ideas. Because sometimes one whopper of a mistake can be more instructive than a binder's worth of best practices, we interviewed more than a dozen security consultants to arrive at our 10 worst practices list. See which ones apply to you, then check our links for advice on how to do things better.

 
Wi-Fi Hotspot Security  16 March 2005 
Source: ComputerSecurityNews - Posted by Benjamin D. Thomas   
You've set up your Boingo account, you're hanging out at the Home Turf sports bar in LAX and you figure you'll do a little business or check your e-mail while sipping a Chardonnay. Well, that's the point of all this; being able to take care of a few things while in a relaxing atmosphere. Don't, however, get so relaxed that you ignore security and give all your confidential information to some unscrupulous hacker. Yeah, you see the guy. He's over in the corner wearing that fake nose and glasses with the ridiculous Bozo the Clown cap. Yep, drinking a Blatz.

 
Find wireless rogues without sensors  03 March 2005 
Source: TechWorld - Posted by Benjamin D. Thomas   
I finally settled on a strategy for wireless security. As wireless access points began appearing on our company's network, we configured them with Cisco's Lightweight Extensible Access Protocol (read my previous article, Migrate WLANs away from Cisco's LEAP). LEAP forces users to authenticate to the access point with their enterprise credentials - the same credentials used for virtual private network access, as well as services such as payroll and Microsoft Exchange e-mail. That's because we use a centralised directory that ties into most of our core applications and lets employees use a single password to sign on.

 
Mesh Networking Soars to New Heights  19 February 2005 
Source: XTVWorld - Posted by Benjamin D. Thomas   
Mesh Networking and community wireless broadband reached new heights with a world first for Locustworld MeshAP PRO when a Shadow microlight aircraft flew over Lincolnshire UK and successfully tested air to ground mesh networking and voice over broadband. South Witham broadband (Lincolnshire UK) joined forces with Make Me Wireless (Australia) and using LocustWorld MeshAP PRO and Asterisk VoIP equipment, seamlessly created air to ground voice communications at 2000 feet with the 16 node South Witham community broadband network.

 
Teething problems for wireless LANs  17 February 2005 
Source: Reseller.co.nz - Posted by Benjamin D. Thomas   
WIRELESS LAN is an emerging trend, but as with most young technologies, it is plagued by insecurities. John Martin, IBM principal security specialist and security practice leader, spends his days advising corporate enterprises on risk management. “The whole end-to-end process must be secure, regardless of the type of industry,? he says.

 
Wi-Fi Alliance to beef up security  14 February 2005 
Source: theregister.co.uk - Posted by Vincenzo Ciaglia   
Security remains the key issue deterring enterprise users from making major investments in Wi-Fi, despite all the improvements over the past year. Whether real or perceived, the security risks of wireless LANs are still holding deployments back. Conscious of this, the Wi-Fi Alliance is trying to beef up standard security still further. It has already agreed to a dual-layer security approach, with WPA2 (the brand name for the 802.11i standard) supporting advanced functions including AES encryption, while the more basic WPA – originally an interim standard en route to 802.11i – will be kept for devices that require less stringent security and lower costs, particularly in the consumer space.


 
WLAN Users Lack Support  14 February 2005 
Source: eweek.com - Posted by Vincenzo Ciaglia   
Setting up a wireless LAN can be as easy as sticking a plug into an outlet. But even technology-savvy customers are complaining that security can be a hassle due to problems with documentation and support. While industry standards bodies are making strides to ensure that even consumer-level WLAN hardware is effective and secure, the user manuals that come with the hardware continue to leave a lot to be desired. "The biggest challenge is inconsistent nomenclature and presentation of the basic components," said Christopher Bell, a software developer in Los Angeles whose home-office WLAN has included wireless routers from Linksys Inc. and Microsoft Corp. as well as myriad PC brands.


 
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