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E-mail Content Security: Filtering Out The Hype  06 December 2006  Print E-mail
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Source: Help Net Security - Posted by LogError   
Latest News E-mail is at risk - vulnerable to external attack from viruses, spam, spyware and phishing technologies. And vulnerable to abuse from within, which could result in: acceptable use policies being compromised; regulatory compliance violations; and/or confidential corporate data being leaked externally.

 
Open Source Linux Security on opensourceloudspeaker.com  05 December 2006  Print E-mail
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Latest News In this edition of the Open Source Loud Speaker broadcast, the topic is the Linux platform as a secure platform and the benefits of Linux in a secure open source environment. Amongst those interviewed by Herb Kraft is founder and CEO of Guardian Digital Dave Wreski. Wreski discusses Guardian Digital's secure version of Linux, EnGarde Secure Linux, and how it impacts the open source security community.

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Introducing Stealth Malware Taxonomy  04 December 2006  Print E-mail
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Source: Help Net Security - Posted by LogError   
Latest News Joanna Rutkowska writes: "At the beginning of this year, at Black Hat Federal Conference, I proposed a simple taxonomy that could be used to classify stealth malware according to how it interacts with the operating system. Since that time I have often referred to this classification as I think it is very useful in designing system integrity verification tools and talking about malware in general. Now I decided to explain this classification a bit more as well as extend it of a new type of malware - the type III malware."

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What are the most common causes of security breaches?  03 December 2006  Print E-mail
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Source: Help Net Security - Posted by Administrator   
Latest News One of the key internal threats to corporates is spyware, because itís all too often introduced without malicious intent, by employees that naively click through a couple of pop-up browser windows, or install an unapproved yet Ďcoolí application on the network. The situation isnít helped by the myths that surround spyware.

 
Bring Back Deleted Files With Lsof  17 November 2006  Print E-mail
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Source: Linux.com - Posted by Eric Lubow   
Latest News There you are, happily playing around with an audio file you've spent all afternoon tweaking, and you're thinking, "Wow, doesn't it sound great? Lemme just move it over here." At that point your subconscious chimes in, "Um, you meant mv, not rm, right?" Oops. I feel your pain -- this happens to everyone. But there's a straightforward method to recover your lost file, and since it works on every standard Linux system, everyone ought to know how to do it. Briefly, a file as it appears somewhere on a Linux filesystem is actually just a link to an inode, which contains all of the file's properties, such as permissions and ownership, as well as the addresses of the data blocks where the file's content is stored on disk. When you rm a file, you're removing the link that points to its inode, but not the inode itself; other processes (such as your audio player) might still have it open. It's only after they're through and all links are removed that an inode and the data blocks it pointed to are made available for writing.

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