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Weighted Round Robin (WRR)

14.8. Weighted Round Robin (WRR)

This qdisc is not included in the standard kernels but can be downloaded from . Currently the qdisc is only tested with Linux 2.2 kernels but it will probably work with 2.4/2.5 kernels too.

The WRR qdisc distributes bandwidth between its classes using the weighted round robin scheme. That is, like the CBQ qdisc it contains classes into which arbitrary qdiscs can be plugged. All classes which have sufficient demand will get bandwidth proportional to the weights associated with the classes. The weights can be set manually using the tc program. But they can also be made automatically decreasing for classes transferring much data.

The qdisc has a built-in classifier which assigns packets coming from or sent to different machines to different classes. Either the MAC or IP and either source or destination addresses can be used. The MAC address can only be used when the Linux box is acting as an ethernet bridge, however. The classes are automatically assigned to machines based on the packets seen.

The qdisc can be very useful at sites such as dorms where a lot of unrelated individuals share an Internet connection. A set of scripts setting up a relevant behavior for such a site is a central part of the WRR distribution.

    
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