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Building bridges, and pseudo-bridges with Proxy ARP

Chapter 16. Building bridges, and pseudo-bridges with Proxy ARP

Bridges are devices which can be installed in a network without any reconfiguration. A network switch is basically a many-port bridge. A bridge is often a 2-port switch. Linux does however support multiple interfaces in a bridge, making it a true switch.

Bridges are often deployed when confronted with a broken network that needs to be fixed without any alterations. Because the bridge is a layer-2 device, one layer below IP, routers and servers are not aware of its existence. This means that you can transparently block or modify certain packets, or do shaping.

Another good thing is that a bridge can often be replaced by a cross cable or a hub, should it break down.

The bad news is that a bridge can cause great confusion unless it is very well documented. It does not appear in traceroutes, but somehow packets disappear or get changed from point A to point B ('this network is HAUNTED!'). You should also wonder if an organization that 'does not want to change anything' is doing the right thing.

The Linux 2.4/2.5 bridge is documented on this page.

16.1. State of bridging and iptables

As of Linux 2.4.14, bridging and iptables do not 'see' each other without help. If you bridge packets from eth0 to eth1, they do not 'pass' by iptables. This means that you cannot do filtering, or NAT or mangling or whatever.

There are several projects going on to fix this, the truly right one is by the author of the Linux 2.4 bridging code, Lennert Buytenhek. He recently informed us that as of bridge-nf 0.0.2 (see the url above), the code is stable and usable in production environments. He is now asking the kernel people if and how the patch can be merged, stay tuned!

    
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